Meeting: 
4° ICCE Chengdu (China) 12-14 May 2018
Abstract: 
Invited speech DEMETER satellite mission (2004-2010) had the purpose to detect electromagnetic anomalous signals potentially preceding large earthquakes. After deep time and space analyses, a clear, although weak, statistical correlation between ionospheric plasma density changes and earthquakes was finally found (e.g. Yan et al., JGR 2017). Swarm three-satellite mission (2013- present) has the objective to observe and model the circumterrestrial magnetic field as better as possible in order to study all contributions to the Earth’s magnetism, from the internal sources in the outer fluid core and the crust, and from external sources, mainly in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. A recent study of the 2015 M7.8 Nepal Earthquake (De Santis et al., EPSL 2017) has showed an S-shape temporal pattern in the magnetic field anomaly data of Swarm satellites before and after the earthquake occurrence, possible signature of a critical system approaching a critical transition. We are now performing more systematic and deeper analyses of the Swarm satellite magnetic and electron ionospheric density data, in order to identify and correlate potential seismic precursors. The work will show the approach we defined and introduced in the framework of SAFE (ESA funding Agency) and LIMADOU-Science (ASI funding agency) Projects as applied to different case studies. It will concern the analysis of electromagnetic data from the Swarm three satellites  by ESA, combined with other kinds of geophysical (e.g. seismic, ionosonde, GPS, climatological, etc.) data for investigating the preparatory phase of large earthquakes. The results show that there is most of the time a certain synchronicity of the different physical parameters forming a chain of processes pointing toward the imminent earthquakes. In the prospect of the recent launched CSES satellite mission, we will finally show how to analyse the satellite data and integrate with other data, mainly with Swarm satellites.   This work is partly funded by the European Space Agency under “SAFE” Project and by the Italian Space Agency under “Limadou-Science" Project.  
Authors: 
A. De Santis & SAFE & LIMADOU Teams